Finding Project Ideas

One of the most important considerations in picking a topic for your science fair project is to find a subject that you consider interesting. You’ll be spending a lot of time on it, so you don’t want your science fair project to be about something that is boring.

We know that finding a topic is the hardest part of a science fair project, and sometimes you just need a little help focusing on what sorts of topics would be of interest to you. To help you find a science fair project idea that interests you, browse through some of the links below or search the web. So click on one of the links below and get started!

  • Society for Science & the Public SSP offers resources to aid in the support of independent student research. They are provided to help students get started with a science fair project and suggest opportunities to further enhance science education.
  • Internet Public Library – Science Fair Project Guide  A resource guide providing a variety of excellent web resources.
  • Mosaic – An online archive of articles published in the The National Science Foundation’s flagship magazine from 1970 to 1992. A background resource for students, teachers, and others in need of a reliable reference for current research.
  • Science Buddies – A non-profit organization providing science fair ideas, resources, answers, and tools. View their project ideas directory!

What Makes a Good Science Fair Project Question?

For a good Science Fair project question, you should answer “Yes” to every question below:

  • Is the topic interesting enough to read about, then work on for the next couple months?
  • Can you find at least 3 sources of written information on the subject?
  • Can you measure changes to the important factors (variables) using a number that represents a quantity such as a count, percentage, length, width, weight, voltage, velocity, energy, time, etc.?
  • Or, just as good, are you measuring a factor (variable) that is simply present or not present? For example,
    • Lights ON in one trial, then lights OFF in another trial,
    • USE fertilizer in one trial, then DON’T USE fertilizer in another trial.
  • Can you design a “fair test” to answer your question? In other words, can you change only one factor (variable) at a time, and control other factors that might influence your experiment, so that they do not interfere?
  • Is your experiment safe to perform?
  • Do you have all the materials and equipment you need for your science fair project, or will you be able to obtain them quickly and at a very low cost?
  • Do you have enough time to do your experiment more than once before the science fair?
  • Does your science fair project meet all the rules and requirements for your science fair?
  • Have you checked to see if your science fair project will require SRC (Scientific Review Committee) approval?
  • Have you avoided the bad science fair project topic areas listed in the table above?